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The classic Craftsman style comes to life with a tapered porch column set atop a stone base with a copper transition. The columns were constructed in the shop, but only three sides were assembled. The three side unit was installed around the the structural post and the fourth side was added.  

 

The pictures below are just a sample of what is in the photo gallery, visit the gallery to check out all the pictures of this project:

View the Photo Gallery

 

Stone Base
Stone bases for the columns where constructed by adhering a concrete stone to cement board that surrounds the structural support post.
Porch Column
Tapered Columns
The tapered columns are constructed using an outdoor, weather and rot resistant material called Extira.
Extira is NOT MDF (read more about Extira). The tapered columns are four sided and feature a unique inset look on each side.
Porch Column
3 Sides Glued
The columns where assembled with three sides glued together. The three-sided unit was slipped around the structural post, secured, and then the fourth side was permantly attached.
Porch Column
Looking Inside
Here's a picture of what the assembled column looks like from the bottom up. Plenty of Titebond II glue to hold it together.
Porch Column
Ready for Installation
After priming and painting the columns, they are ready for installation. The primer and paint for applied using a $100 Wagner powershot, and I was very suprised at the quality application that this gun provided. The results are smooth and even.
Porch Column
Copper Clad Transition
More Extira was used to create a transition element between the stone base and the tapered columns. The Extira was clad in copper.
Porch Column
Column Installation
The three-sided columns are fitted around the structural post and secured. The fourth side of the column was attached using biscuits, glue and clamps. The butt joints were sanded flush and painted to match the other corners of the columns.
Porch Column

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Undermount puck lights add a dynamic element to this fireplace mantle. The mantle looks like a solid beam, but it is really a hollow floating shelf. 

 

The pictures below are just a sample of what is in the photo gallery, visit the gallery to check out all the pictures of this project:

View the Photo Gallery

 

The Hollow Beam
I wanted the look of a substantial mantle over the fireplace, but I also wanted downlights to illuminate the stone surround. The hollow mantle served both purposes.
Mantle Beam
The puck lights
The lights are recessed into the bottom of the beam so that they are flush.
Puck Lights
Wall Mounted Cleats
The hollow mantle beam hangs from the wall by attaching to cleats. A switched outlet receptable will activate the lights.
Wall Mounted Cleats
The End of the Beam
The end of the beam is filled with wood pieces so that the exposed end looks solid. This exposed end is shaped to fit around a three-sided vertical post.
Beam End
Attaching Post to Beam
In addition to the cleats, the beam is attached to the post by two dowels that are glued in place through both pieces.
Beam End
Flush cut the dowels
The dowels are cut flush with the surface of the beam and sanded smooth. The illusion of true post and beam construction is taking shape.
Beam End
The Finsihed Beam
The finished beam looks massive and rings true to post and beam construction. The undermount lights cast nice shadows on the stone facade.
Beam End
The Hearth Ties In
The hearth was made to look like it was sitting on a second beam. The unity of the mantle and the hearth tie everything together.
Beam End

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I recently had the pleasure of building a Mission style cherry coffee table using components from Osborne Wood Products. Osborne Wood products provided the legs, skirt boards and corner braces. I made the table top with a few eye catching features like bread board ends and pyramid shaped plugs.


Part II coming SOON A second video is being worked on now that details how the breadboard table top is contructed.



Details on making breadboard ends

"A breadboard end is a narrow piece that is mechanically joined to the end of a larger panel. The purpose is to support and maintain the rigidity of the panel, while allowing the panel to shrink or expand across the grain." - excerpt from an article on FWW.com by Mario Rodriguez titled All About Breadboard Ends



Step 1 - form a tenon on the end of the board by using the tablesaw and the router table
Breadboard Ends Breadboard Ends



Step 2 - the long tenon is fine-tuned to match the mortise that is made in the end piece.
Breadboard Ends Breadboard Ends



Step 3 - when there's a good fit between the breadboard end and the table top, square holes are made in the end of the breadboard to house the screws that attached the end to the table top.
Breadboard Ends Breadboard Ends



Step 4 - the breadboard ends are attached using glue on only the center 6 inches of the joint. The screws through the end (elongated holes) add strength and stability to the joint.
Breadboard Ends Breadboard Ends



Step 5 - pyramid headed plugs are formed using the crosscut sled. The plugs are glued into the square holes to hide the screws.
Breadboard Ends Breadboard Ends

Arts and Crafts Cabinet

by John W. Nixon on February 7 2010 18:17

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This classic looking Arts and Crafts style cabinet was designed to have a television sit on top, with the audio video equipment on the open shelf. There's generous cabinet space below which is concealed by two locking frame and panel doors. The appearance and design is true to the Arts and Crafts motif, but under the covers, this piece hides a dark secret.

 

The entire process of constructing this cabinet was filmed, and the video is being edited now (2/8/2010). I expect part one of this series to be released in a about a week.

 

You may be surprised to discover that this cabinet started it's life as a mid-sixties dresser made by the R-WAY company. I gave the piece a dramatic makover and transformed it into a classic Arts and Crafts cabinet (asthetically at least).

 

From the pictures in the gallery you can see that this piece present many of the American Arts and Crafts features (too bad they're almost all fake).

  • Through Mortise and Tenon pinned joinery
  • Corbels supporting the overhanging top
  • Quartersawn white oak construction
  • Arched base
  • Frame and panel construction
  • Hand-hammered hardware with antique lockset
  • Backsplash

 

The Original Piece
I wanted to do something with this well made dresser I had stowed in the closet. My neighbor was moving and asked if I wanted this piece. I can't refuse anything made of wood (especially if it has dovetails!). This dresser had bow front drawers and a very dark finish. The piece didn't appeal to my tastes, so it sat in the closet for about 3 years. The need for a place to set my new TV arose, and I figured I could give this old dark dresser a makover into something that suited my tastes.
Original Dresser

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This project is a queen sized bed inspired by a Stickley Panel bed. I didn't have anything to go on other than the picture from the Stickley web site, and the overall dimensions. I set to work drawing up my own plans from these two bits of information.


The construction of the bed features through mortise and tenon joints connecting the horizontal rails to the posts. The headboard and the footboard have a frame and panel construction where vertical stiles contain the panels and connect the two horizontal stiles. The top horizontal stiles on the headboard and footboard have a broad inverted V shape that is characteristic of a number of Stickley pieces.


Update 5/30/09 - I am almost done with the first three videos for this series. I cover how to make the panels in part 1, how to make the horizontal rails in part 2, and how to make the vertical stiles and assemble the frame and panel section in part 3. If all goes well, all three parts should be released Sunday night (5/31/09)

Stickley Panel Bed in progress Stickley Panel Bed in progress
Stickley Panel Bed in progress Stickley Panel Bed in progress

Update 5/24/09 - Work on the bed is progressing nicely. I made the tenons on the horizontal rails using the crosscut sled and the bandsaw. The crosscut sled took care of the shoulder cuts, and the bandsaw cut off the cheeks. Overall, I'm please with this method, but I'd rather be using my tenon jig. The length of these piece prohibited the use of the tenon jig (too tall, they would hit the ceiling, and it would be a little akward).

Stickley Panel Bed in progress Stickley Panel Bed in progress
Stickley Panel Bed in progress Stickley Panel Bed in progress
Stickley Panel Bed in progress Stickley Panel Bed in progress

Update 5/17/09 - Filming of this project is underway. I've posted some in progress shots below. Stay tuned, I hope to have the first video in the series out soon. Please post any questions or comments you have about this poject.

Stickley Panel Bed in progress Stickley Panel Bed in progress
Stickley Panel Bed in progress Stickley Panel Bed in progress

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